Stephanie Wessell

My Story from Twisted50 vol 1: The Beholder

 

Favourite quote: ‘We've gone on holiday by mistake. We're in this cottage here. Are you the farmer?’-Withnail and I

 

 

 

 

 

My Links: Twitter // Facebook // Create50 profile // Good Reads Profile // Amazon Author //  IMDB // Website // Vimeo // LinkedIn // Soundcloud

My Twisted50 Blog Posts

Talking Twisted by Steph Wessell from the Twisted50 Book Launch

Ok, so I was a bit tipsy... and giddy with getting an unexpected, lovely and oh-so-heavy glass award (2nd Best Story)… and feeling really sociable, meeting face-to-face many friends I'd previously met only virtually in the Create 50 community… and I was so happy to be showing my husband and friends (also in attendance) the reality of how fabulous and special the whole Twisted 50 experience is… and very proud that readers had sought me out at the party to tell me how they'd enjoyed my story… and it was so nice to see old friends that I hadn't seen for years (Helen Lloyd and I used to work together; Ellie Torrez starred in a portmanteau collaborative feature film that I co-wrote and co-directed, and there were a few pals from the London Screenwriters Festival there too)… and I really don't get the chance to dress up posh very often… and it was close to the end of the evening so we were being ushered out...

 

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Listen to Steph Wessell on BBC Radio Bristol talking Create50!

Our very own one woman marketing machine Steph Wessell has been spreading the good news about Twisted50 again by getting herself on the radio and slaying it like a pro.

 

It’s a terrific interview, and listen to how it sounds when the host refers to knocking Stephen King off the top spot.

 

Twisted50 writers… That’s YOUR book they are talking about. Get sharing and promoting now ahead of the party… Listen below…

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Success lies at the crossroads between experience and opportunity

If success lies at the crossroads between experience and opportunity, then the simple act of creative collaboration is by far the best strategy to increase your experience and opportunities.

When we create, be it writing, making movies, marketing our stuff, we more often than not work in partnership with others, sometimes even a bigger team. Relationships are made, debts and favours exchanged, experience gained…

 

It’s like each major act of creativity is like throwing a stone in a pond. The ripples spread out and often, keep going, sometimes even for decades. That same pond has others creating too, and their ripples are bound to interact with yours too, creating yet more crossroads and opportunities.

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'The Beholder' by Stephanie Wessell, audiobook excerpt read by Kat Rose Martin

Post by Stephanie Wessell

 

It’s with some trepidation that I sit down to listen to this extract of my story in its new audio form. My narrator, Hannah, has lived in my head for over a year but, perhaps weirdly, I have no set ideas about where she comes from, her ethnicity or what class she is.
 
I am, however, definite about Hannah’s age, so I’m slightly worried that an adult voice actor might sound too old for my fictional teenager-veering-on-womanhood. I obviously know Hannah well and feel very protective of her. Will another artist’s interpretation of her voice damage my own slightly nebulous, imagined version?

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The Beholder: How We’re All Watched… by Stephanie Wessell

For me, truly horrifying tales involve a hidden evil within normal, everyday life. Imagine: there’s an unsettling spirit entity watching you read this RIGHT NOW. Can’t you feel it, observing you? It’s right here, just at your shoulder, willing you to turn around… look. Look now. LOOK!

Nothing there? It doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist… and that’s how The Beholder arrived in my head. As a reader and viewer of horror I’m always at my most terrified before the ghost or monster presents itself. The prospect lurking deep in our imaginations is often scarier than what might really be there… and hints at how we see ourselves and our precarious place in the world. To feel watched can make us feel frightened, but also validated: we look around to reassure ourselves and to discover how we might be seen by someone… something… else.

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